Similarities between today’s teens and those in The Hunger Games

We thought this was an interesting little piece that examines how the actions of the teens in The Hunger Game are similar to those of  real life teens.  Obviously many children do deal with some of the same issues that The Hunger Games kids do, such as family dysfunction and bullying. This article provides an insightful look into the parallels of the two worlds, check out an excerpt below.

“The Hunger Games” shows a grim futuristic world where teens are forced by a totalitarian government to fight to the death on national TV. The movie has now been the top-grossing film in the U.S. for three weeks.

The story’s heroine is Katniss Everdeen, a tough-as-nails 16-year-old girl who provides for and protects her family after her father’s death, and fights in the survival contest. While the setting of the “Hunger Games” is certainly extreme, experts say that some of Katniss’ behaviors and reactions to the events of her life, along with those of her fellow fighting “tributes,” are big-screen versions of the behaviors and reactions of real teens.

Here are six reasons why experts say teens’ actions in the movie the movie aren’t too far off from reality.

1. Sacrificing for a sibling

In the movie, Katniss’ younger sister is randomly selected to take part in the deadly Hunger Games contest, but Katniss volunteers to take her sister’s place.

In real life, siblings — especially those in families where parents have withdrawn from their children — often become willing to sacrifice for each other, experts say.

“Since her father died, Katniss’ mother became emotionally and psychologically removed from the family,” said Tricia East, a developmental psychologist at the University of California in San Diego.

“Usually what happens is that the oldest sibling takes on the responsibility of their mom,” East said.

“Under such circumstances, Katniss becomes a ‘surrogate mother,’” East said, so “it’s not surprising that she would give up her life for her.”

Click HERE to read the rest!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s